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council, we know that russia has been supplying hardware for assad. we understand -- we think that the americans are supporting ticket. this is a security council who is doing nothing in this situation. why should anyone believe that the u.n. can fix things? >> you are right that the divisions in the council make a solution difficult. that was one of the reasons i resigned, as you know, but the challenge is to overcome those divisions and get them working -- i tried. at the beginning, they came together, but it was not sustained. if the security council is not made to come together, then we are in a really hopeless situation. >> and syria will descend further into war? >> it could get worse. it could get much worse. how do we solve the problem? militarization or intervention, in my judgment, will make the situation much worse. >> what do you foresee happening? >> i think the neighbors will be drawn in. already, we have seen thousands of refugees fleeing to jordan, lebanon, turkey, iraq. she hottest elements are coming in across the border -- jihadist elements are coming in acr
is a really difficult proposition. and it's a complex to society. when mr. assad goes as i believe eventually he will, what takes its place. how do we do that? these are complicated things. i don't know enough about-- when every one of these things is going on, gi out of my way not to talk to hillary about it so i don't have any information i shouldn't have so i don't inadvertently say something to you that i shouldn't say. so i don't know what their options are. but i think that if we have some nonlethal options that we could use to support the syrian opposition, i presume we would be doing it. and i wouldn't be surprised if we are. i think most people believe that assad is going to have to go. it's sooner or later he will. and their concern about whether-- whatever arrangements that succeeds him can preserve a secular state can preserve a state which gives women a commendable amount of opportunities when compared with the competition in the region, you know, and but is less oppressive, less repressive and less subject to the siren song of the iranians and hezbollah and other forces that pro
the officials loyal to president bashar al-assad. they renewed it last week to gain control with aleppo. a free syrian army spokesperson says the assad regime mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. he says rebel fighters plan to carry out simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> citizens upset by iran's plummeting currency have taken to the streets of the capital tehran. their protests highlight their growing frustration with the government. protesters fought with riot police in the city's main bazaar. they were demanding the government stop the fall of the rial. demonstrators staged another protest in a different area of the city. iran's currency has lost 70% of the value in the past year and hit record lows against the dollar. u.s. and european sanctions targeting iran are hurting the economy. anti-government protests are unusual in iran. an exchanger at the bazaar said the demonstrators were merchants. >> there have been no reports of injuries, but many shops are closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. >>> japan's foreign minister
think the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others around the table. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >> they already are a part of it. >> they have dealt themselves in but in a negative way. >> but the united states has not bought into that idea. >> it is very difficult and if you are saying to me what is going to be the thing that in the end find a way through, i haven't yet seen a military plan that has said to me, yes this is a way of protecting those people. and -- but the threat from the minister in my time said the definition of foreign policy is stopping people from killing each other and i am not seeing governance or intelligence i have not seen an intervention plan that could in the least bit work. >> i am not ar
. a burial takes place and nato condemns the assad regime. welcome to gmt. david eades. coming up, with an audience of 50 million to impress, as romney gained ground on obama in the first of the televised presidential debates? >> it is not moral for my generation to keep spending more than we take in, knowing those burdens of will be passed on to the next generation. >> i promised i would fight every single day on behalf of the american people, the middle class, and all those striving to get into the middle class. kept that promise. >> also -- ♪ ♪ you know i love you >> 50 years since the beatles released their first single. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey where the parliament is in an emergency session over a bill of the rise across borders military operations in syria. turkey has already retaliated to the mortar attack that killed five people in a border town. despite international calls for restraint, that military response is still going on. reports that syrian soldiers may have been killed. now this report. >> the
condition? in other words, nothing has to happen because, as you know, the rebels are demanding assad has to leave. >> yeah. >> rose: and they're not willing apparently, to have much political conversations until that happens. >> yeah, but my point is that for the first time an international gathering agreed on a process, an international meeting including russia agreed on a process leading to a transition in syria. my point is that could serve as the basis for an international response through the u.n. security council. you asked me what could i recommend. >> rose: right, right. >> that's what i could recommend. and, of course, if the parties involved did not comply with that binding resolution, it should have some consequences. it's not for me to elaborate on which consequences. but i do believe that the whole international community has a responsibility to prevent what i see as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the
with one overwhelmingly powerful egyptian pharaoh named anwar sadat. in syria he dealt with hafez assad and in israel he dealt with golda meyer who has such a majority in the israeli parliament no one had ever heard of the likud my noorty policy. so kissinger had to deliver three people. flash forward, you're hillary clinton now. you have to negotiate with a muslim brotherhood president of egypt who is in a -- just new to the job in a very frail and weak situation. you've got a revolution in syria, there's basically no one to deal with. you could deal with haefz but he can't deliver six blocks beyond his palace and in israel you have a minority government led baby by netanyahu that is an extreme government. it's michele bachmann 20 times over. so it's not exactly an environment conducive for great heroic foreign policy. mama, tell your daughters not to grow up to secretaries of state, not now. you want to be secretary of education, not secretary of state. >> rose: (laughs) so what ought to be the foreign policy debate in this campaign? >> well, i tell you what i've been focused on and i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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